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OVERVIEW


ECONOMIC JUSTICE

Legislation 

  • H.2172/S.1048 (Paid Family & Medical Leave): An Act establishing a family and medical leave insurance program (Gordon-Spilka)
  • H.2365/S.1004 ($15 minimum wage): An Act to improve the Commonwealth’s economy with a strong minimum wage and a strong tipped minimum wage (Donahue-Donnelly)
  • Fair Share Amendment (Citizen Petition/Ballot Initiative, aka, “Millionaire’s Tax”)

Why are these bills important?

What do these bills do?

More Information


AFFORDABLE HOUSING


EDUCATION 

Legislation

  • S.223: An Act modernizing the Foundation Budget for the 21st century (Chang-Diaz)

  • H.633: An Act making public higher education in Massachusetts free for residents of the state (Gentile)

  • S.681: An Act promoting access to debt-free public higher education (Eldridge)

Why are these bills important?

What do these bills do? 

More Information


HEALTHCARE 


IMMIGRANTS’ RIGHTS


CRIMINAL JUSTICE REFORM 

Legislation 

Why are these bills important? 

What do these bills do?

More Information 


VOTING ACCESS


SUSTAINABLE INFRASTRUCTURE & ENVIRONMENT 

Legislation 

Why are these bills important? 

What do these bills do? 


Please share and distribute at your events and meetings, with attribution. print version: progressivemass.com/factsheet


 


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| ECONOMIC JUSTICE | HOUSING | EDUCATION | HEALTHCARE | - | IMMIGRANTS’ RIGHTS | CRIMINAL JUSTICE REFORMS | - | VOTER ACCESS | - | CLIMATE/ENERGY |

ECONOMIC JUSTICE

PROGRESSIVE MASSACHUSETTS Legislative Agenda 2017-18
more info: progressivemass.com/agenda

Legislation

  • H.2172/S.1048 (Paid Family & Medical Leave): An Act establishing a family and medical leave insurance program (Gordon-Spilka)

  • H.2365/S.1004 ($15 minimum wage): An Act to improve the Commonwealth’s economy with a strong minimum wage and a strong tipped minimum wage (Donahue-Donnelly) 

  • Fair Share Amendment (Citizen Petition/Ballot Initiative, aka, “Millionaire’s Tax”)

| TOP | | ECONOMIC JUSTICE |

Why are these bills important?

Massachusetts has one of the most extreme levels of income inequality in the country. Despite our state and nation’s wealth, many individuals and families work hard and struggle to get by. Wages have stagnated, meaning that while productivity rises, prosperity does not. If our minimum wage had risen at the same rate as productivity since 1979, it would today be greater than $21/hour––and that pales in comparison to the spike in CEO compensation over the past decades.

Even worse, over the past decades, the 1% and 0.1% wealthiest have paid a smaller and smaller share of their income and assets back to society. The wealth divide, amplified across lines of race and gender, is growing. As top executives, investors and inheritors of wealth make millions or billions of dollars, workers have struggled to make ends meet, to care for sick loved ones, and to plan for their future, and the physical and social infrastructure that is the foundation of shared prosperity suffers from chronic underinvestment.

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What do these bills do?

Paid Family and Medical Leave (H.2172/S.1048)

This legislation would make employees eligible for job-protected paid leave to recover from a serious illness or injury, to care for a seriously ill or injured family member, or to care for a new child. It would also prohibit employer retaliation against workers who take time off under these conditions. Employees taking paid leave would receive partial wage replacement equal to a percentage of their average weekly wages, with a maximum weekly benefit of either $650 or $1,000. Paid leave would last up to either 12 or 16 weeks to care for a seriously ill or injured family member or to bond with a new child (family leave), and up to 26 weeks for an employee’s own serious illness or injury (medical leave).

Benefits would be funded through employer premium contributions to the new Family and Employment Security Trust Fund or to private insurance plans. Both bills would allow employers to require employees to contribute up to 50% of the cost of premiums. The bills phase in over a few years, create a one-week waiting period before employees can receive benefits, use existing agencies for administration and enforcement, and allow companies to keep existing plans.

| TOP | | ECONOMIC JUSTICE |

$15/hour Minimum Wage and Tipped Minimum Wage (H.2365/S.1004)

This legislation would raise the state’s minimum wage by $1 each year over four years until it is $15 an hour in 2021. The minimum wage would then be adjusted each year to rise along with increases in the cost of living. Increasing the minimum wage to $15 by 2021 would raise the wages of roughly 947,000 workers, or 29 percent of the state’s workforce. 91 percent of workers who would be affected are over 20 years old, 56 percent are women, and 57 percent work full-time. Increasing the minimum wage to $15 by 2021 would also raise the wages of 22 percent of all working parents. Furthermore, nearly one-third of all kids in the Commonwealth live in households that would benefit from the minimum wage increase.

The legislation would also increase the sub-minimum wage for tipped workers, currently $3.75 an hour, over 8 years until it is equal to the regular minimum wage. The sub-minimum wage for tipped workers creates financial uncertainty for servers at diners, pubs, and pancake houses; hairdressers; car wash staff; airport wheelchair and parking attendants; valets; and others–– and makes them vulnerable to harassment and discrimination. 68% of tipped workers in Boston are women earning $3.75/hour, and many report wage theft, unsafe working conditions, lack of advancement opportunity, or sexual harassment on the job.

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Fair Share Amendment (Citizen Petition/Ballot Initiative)

The Fair Share Amendment would amend the Massachusetts Constitution to create an additional tax of 4% on annual income above $1 million, so only those with the highest incomes would pay a little more. The new revenue generated by this tax, estimated at $1.9 billion in 2019, could only be spent on quality public education, affordable public colleges and universities, and repair and maintenance of roads, bridges, and public transportation. To ensure that the tax continues to apply only to the highest income residents, who have the ability to pay more, the $1 million threshold would be adjusted each year to reflect cost-of-living increases. The Legislature voted to advance the Fair Share amendment in a constitutional convention last year and must do so again this year before it goes to the ballot in 2018.

The need for increased public spending on education and transportation is stark. Massachusetts spends below the national average on pre-K and relies on an out-of-date funding formula for our public school districts, which fails to provide districts with the resources they need and entrenches regional inequalities. Moreover, Massachusetts has been reducing its investment in higher education for years and now ranks 45th in state spending on higher education as a share of our economy. We need to reinvest in public higher education to make it affordable for middle- and working-class students in our state.

483 bridges in Massachusetts are structurally deficient, plagued by major deterioration, cracks, or other flaws that reduce the ability to support vehicles, and 16% of our public roads are in poor condition, costing drivers $539 per year. Chronic underinvestment prevents us from modernizing and expanding our public transit system to offer an affordable, environmentally friendly alternative.

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More Information

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| ECONOMIC JUSTICE | HOUSING | EDUCATION | HEALTHCARE | - | IMMIGRANTS’ RIGHTS | CRIMINAL JUSTICE REFORMS | - | VOTER ACCESS | - | CLIMATE/ENERGY |

 AFFORDABLE HOUSING

PROGRESSIVE MASSACHUSETTS Legislative Agenda 2017-18
more info: progressivemass.com/agenda

Legislation: S. 81: An act promoting housing and sustainable development (Chandler)

| TOP | | HOUSING |

Why is this bill important?

Although Massachusetts recently ranked #1 in the U.S. News & World Report ranking of states, it was also an embarrassing #44 in housing affordability, and it’s not difficult to see why. A minimum-wage worker would have to work 83 hours each week to afford a modest one-bedroom at fair market rent, and one in four renters spend at least half their household income on rent. MA has the fastest-growing population in the Northeast, but a much slower rate of housing production than that most other states. And insofar as new housing is being produced, much of it is out of reach for most Massachusetts residents. Affordable housing wait lists grow larger, as subsidies for affordable housing at the federal and state level get smaller.

Many of Massachusetts’s outdated zoning laws encourage sprawl; however, people are increasingly craving walkable, transit-friendly, high-density neighborhoods because they reduce transportation costs, foster a sense of community, facilitate a thriving local economy, and improve quality of life.

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What does this bill do?

This bill modernizes state land use laws for the first time in forty years, encouraging greater affordable housing production and sustainable, transit-oriented development throughout Massachusetts through zoning reform and other measures. It requires cities and towns to permit more multi-family housing production, codifies inclusionary zoning, and allows homeowners to create “accessory dwelling units” on their property to house relatives or generate rental income to help them afford their own home. It creates a predictable process for cities and towns to assess impact fees on developers to offset the cost of infrastructure and enables developers to cluster development in order to conserve land. The bill also requires cities and towns to build natural resource protection, energy efficiency, and renewable energy into their master planning process so that growth does not come at the expense of sustainability.

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More Information

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| ECONOMIC JUSTICE | HOUSING | EDUCATION | HEALTHCARE | - | IMMIGRANTS’ RIGHTS | CRIMINAL JUSTICE REFORMS | - | VOTER ACCESS | - | CLIMATE/ENERGY |

EDUCATION

PROGRESSIVE MASSACHUSETTS Legislative Agenda 2017-18
more info: progressivemass.com/agenda

Legislation

  • S.223: An Act modernizing the Foundation Budget for the 21st century (Chang-Diaz)

  • H.633: An Act making public higher education in Massachusetts free for residents of the state (Gentile)

  • S. 681: An Act promoting access to debt-free public higher education (Eldridge)

| TOP | | EDUCATION |

Why are these bills important?

Massachusetts is the birthplace of public education in the US, and we have reason to pride ourselves in our system. Our public schools routinely rank first in the nation because of high standardized test scores and postsecondary degree attainment rates. However, such high overall scores mask persistent inequities that continue to pose an obstacle to children’s ability to realize their full potential. The achievement gap between low-income and better-off students is one of the highest in the nation, as are disparities in per-pupil spending.

In the 21st century economy, a college degree is increasingly a requirement for many fields, but Massachusetts has not been investing accordingly. Higher education spending has been cut by 14% since FY 2001, with the cuts in per-student spending and total scholarship funding more than double that. Because of these cuts, tuition and fees at public colleges and universities have doubled, leaving more students with greater debt.

| TOP | | EDUCATION |

What do these bills do?

Modernizing the Foundation Budget for the 21st Century (S.223)

This bill acknowledges that the local education aid formula developed in 1993 is now well out-of-date. The 2015 Foundation Budget Review Commission found that Massachusetts is underestimating the cost of K-12 education by $1-2 billion each year. S.223 would authorize a multi-year phase-in of the Foundation Budget Review Commission recommendations in order to properly account for healthcare and special education costs and provide districts with adequate resources to help close the achievement gaps for low-income students and English Language Learners.

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Free Public Higher Education (H.633)

This bill requires the Commonwealth to pay the tuition and mandatory curriculum fees for residents of the Commonwealth attending any community college or state university in the Commonwealth and creates a program of needs-based financial assistance to provide full or partial scholarships for non-residents attending any of the institutions of higher education in the Commonwealth.

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Debt-free Public Higher Education (S.681)

This bill requires the Commonwealth to pay the tuition and mandatory curriculum fees for residents of the Commonwealth with annual family incomes of $200,000 or less attending any community college or state university in the Commonwealth beyond what is covered by state/federal grants or gifts through the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) process. Eligible students must be enrolled full-time and maintain a grade point average of at least 2.7. The Commonwealth would also pay for the housing and transportation costs for students whose annual family incomes are less than or equal to the median income in the Commonwealth.

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More Information

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- | CLIMATE/ENERGY |
 

HEALTHCARE

PROGRESSIVE MASSACHUSETTS Legislative Agenda 2017-18
more info: progressivemass.com/agenda

Legislation: H.2987/S.619: An Act establishing Medicare for All in Massachusetts (Garlick-Eldridge)

Why is this bill important?

Although MA’s 2006 healthcare reform bill and the 2010 Affordable Care Act were significant steps forward, we have not yet achieved the goal of universal, affordable, and high-quality health coverage. Quality of coverage and care still highly correlates with income, and racial disparities persist. Rising healthcare costs are destroying state, municipal, business, and household budgets. MA has the highest per capita healthcare costs in the US, and every year costs go higher and higher.

A single payer system would save an estimated 15.75% of our current spending on healthcare; take the burden of rising healthcare costs off of small businesses, municipalities, and families; eliminate medical debt and medical bankruptcy; and finally guarantee access to quality, affordable healthcare as a right for all residents of the Commonwealth.

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What does this bill do?

This bill would create a Medicare for All “single-payer” system for Massachusetts: a universal public insurance plan covering all medically necessary care. This plan would function for residents under 65 much the way Medicare does for residents 65 and older, but without premiums or copayments.

The bill would replace current employer and employee premium payments with an employer and employee payroll tax. The total payroll tax would be 10% – the same as current average spending on health insurance – and would default to 7.5% for employers and 2.5% for employees, although employers could choose to pay for part or all of employees’ portion of the payroll tax, and collective bargaining agreements would be recognized. A tax of 12.5% on unearned income would bring progressivity to the bill’s funding scheme. Lastly, all current state spending on healthcare would be consolidated, and the state would seek a federal waiver to have federal funds (e.g., for Medicare and Medicaid patients) paid directly to the state’s single payer fund.

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More Information

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| ECONOMIC JUSTICE | HOUSING | EDUCATION | HEALTHCARE | - | IMMIGRANTS’ RIGHTS | CRIMINAL JUSTICE REFORMS |  - | VOTER ACCESS | - | CLIMATE/ENERGY |

IMMIGRANTS’ RIGHTS

PROGRESSIVE MASSACHUSETTS Legislative Agenda 2017-18
more info: progressivemass.com/agenda

Legislation: H.3269/S.1305 (“Safe Communities”): An Act To Promote the Civil Rights and Safety of All Massachusetts Residents (Matias-Eldridge)

Why is this bill important?

The Safe Communities Act would protect the civil rights of all state residents by making sure our tax dollars are not used to help the Trump administration deport immigrant families or create a Muslim registry. When police become Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agents, immigrant victims and witnesses of crime are afraid to call police, which makes us all less safe.

| TOP | | IMMIGRANTS' RIGHTS |

What does this bill do?

The Safe Communities Act separates state resources, law enforcement, and databases from federal immigration or surveillance practices that could be used to target immigrant populations or form a Muslim registry. Specifically, the legislation prohibits law enforcement agencies and the Registry of Motor Vehicles from allowing access to databases or records for enforcement of any federal registry program based on national origin, religion, or other protected characteristics.

In addition, the legislation ensures that state, local, and campus police don’t participate in federal immigration enforcement activities, including participation in inquiries, investigations, raids, arrests, or detentions that are based solely on immigration status. It also prohibits collaboration agreements between the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and law enforcement agencies that deputize state and local officers as immigration agents, like those recently concluded by Bristol and Plymouth counties.

The bill also ensures basic due process rights for immigrants detained in state and local facilities. Detainees must be informed-in a language they understand-that they have the right to decline an interview with ICE agents and to have their own attorney present (at their own expense) if they so choose.

The bill upholds constitutional standards while conforming to federal law and puts citizens and non-citizens on equal footing with respect to law enforcement. It would not prevent police from arresting or detaining a person in the course of a criminal investigation or prosecution supported by probable cause of a crime, which is consistent with constitutional standards applicable to all people in the Commonwealth.

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More Information

wbur.org/cognoscenti/2017/03/07/massachusetts-should-become-a-sanctuary-state-karen-pita-loor

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| ECONOMIC JUSTICE | HOUSING | EDUCATION | HEALTHCARE | - | IMMIGRANTS’ RIGHTS | CRIMINAL JUSTICE REFORMS | - | VOTER ACCESS | - | CLIMATE/ENERGY | 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE REFORM

PROGRESSIVE MASSACHUSETTS Legislative Agenda 2017-18
more info: progressivemass.com/agenda

Legislation

  • H.2308/S.791: An Act for comprehensive justice reform (Keefe-Chang-Diaz)

  • H.741/S.819: An Act to eliminate mandatory minimum sentences related to drug offenses (Carvalho-Creem)

  • H.2359/S.777: An Act to reduce the criminalization of poverty (Tyler-Brownsberger)

| TOP | | CRIMINAL JUSTICE REFORMS |

Why are these bills important?

Oversentencing

The Massachusetts incarceration rate, while low compared to other states, is three to four times higher than that of European countries. In fact, there are only seven countries with a higher incarceration rate than Massachusetts.

| TOP | | CRIMINAL JUSTICE REFORMS |

Racial Disparities

Incarceration rates disproportionately affect black and Hispanic residents compared to white residents. Massachusetts has the highest Hispanic-to-white disparity in the US and a higher than average disparity between blacks and whites.

| TOP | | CRIMINAL JUSTICE REFORMS |

Impact on communities

Studies have shown that high levels of incarceration have devastating consequences for minority communities, including an increase in crime, poverty, and homelessness. In many neighborhoods which are primarily of color, a significant percentage of male residents spend time in prison as they transition to adulthood. After release, it is difficult to find housing and stable employment and to support a family.

| TOP | | CRIMINAL JUSTICE REFORMS |

Costs

For Fiscal Year 2014, the average cost per year to house an inmate in the Massachusetts Department of Corrections was $53,040.87, money not spent on the social investments that can create thriving communities.

| TOP | | CRIMINAL JUSTICE REFORMS |

What do these bills do?

An Act for justice reinvestment (H.2308/S.791)

This bill would enact comprehensive justice reform, complementing reductions in sentencing with job training, youth jobs, and pre-apprenticeship programs. This omnibus bill covers the standalone bills below, including the repeal of long mandatory minimum drug sentences, the increase of the felony threshold for theft from $250 to $1500, CORI reform (a reduction of sealing times, i.e., the time after which a record can be sealed from CORI searches, from 10 and 5 years to 7 and 3 years), and an end to probation and parole fees. Under this bill, the money saved by ending unnecessary and overly harsh sentences would go to support in-prison job training and reentry programs for job training and job placement.

| TOP | | CRIMINAL JUSTICE REFORMS |

An Act to eliminate mandatory minimum sentences related to drug offenses (H.741/S.819)

This bill would restore judicial discretion in sentencing for nonviolent drug charges, reducing the economic and social costs of extended prison terms. Current mandatory minimum law empowers district attorneys to determine sentencing and prevents judges from factoring extenuating circumstances into the case, mandating one-size-fits-all sentences. Black defendants are much more likely to be sentenced under a mandatory minimum than white ones. DAs use the threat of mandatory minimums to coerce guilty pleas out of defendants who are sometimes innocent of the crime, a misapplication of justice that is very costly to the state.

| TOP | | CRIMINAL JUSTICE REFORMS |

An Act to reduce the criminalization of poverty (H.2359/S.777)

This bill would eliminate or reduce numerous fees, such as parole supervision, and would prevent indigent residents from being jailed or given unreasonable fees simply because they struggle to pay court-related fines. It also ensures people do not face barriers to housing and work because of offenses committed long ago.

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More Information

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VOTING ACCESS

PROGRESSIVE MASSACHUSETTS Legislative Agenda 2017-18
more info: progressivemass.com/agenda

Legislation: H.2500/S.373: An Act Automatically Registering Eligible Voters and Enhancing Safeguards against Fraud (Kocot-Creem)

| TOP | | VOTING ACCESS |

Why is this bill important?

A strong democracy is one in which all citizens have the opportunity and ability to participate and make their voices heard. Automatic registration helps make voting easier by taking away the burden of registration from individual citizens and integrating it seamlessly into standard government operations.

Automatic voter registration eliminates the need for constant re-registration when people move, and by digitizing the registration process, it can significantly cut down on the cost (and paperwork) involved, benefiting cities and towns.

To date, five states have passed laws adopting automatic voter registration: Oregon, California, Vermont, West Virginia, and Alaska. Massachusetts has a history of being on the forefront of progressive policymaking; Massachusetts should be next.

| TOP | | VOTING ACCESS |

What does this bill do?

Numerous state agencies currently register voters under the federal “motor voter” law. This bill would change the system from “opt-in” to “opt-out,” requiring agencies to collect registration information for citizens who interface with them and to transmit such information in a secure fashion to local Registrars of Voters.

The bill also requires Massachusetts to join the Electronic Registration Information Center (ERIC), a national clearinghouse that collects state registration information to eliminate duplicate registration and directs local Registrars to communicate in-state to avoid duplicate registration as well.

The Secretary of State would be required to issue regulations to prevent the erroneous disenfranchisement of eligible citizens and to protect non-citizens from being erroneously registered.

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More Information

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SUSTAINABLE INFRASTRUCTURE & ENVIRONMENT

PROGRESSIVE MASSACHUSETTS Legislative Agenda 2017-18
more info: progressivemass.com/agenda

Legislation

S.1880: An Act creating 21st century Massachusetts clean energy jobs (Pacheco)

H.2706/S.1864: An Act relative to solar power and the green economy (Mark-Eldridge)

H.3400/S.1847: An Act clarifying authorities and responsibilities of the Dept. of Public Utilities (Kulik-Eldridge)

H.1726: An Act to promote green infrastructure, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and create jobs (Benson)

S.1821: An Act combating climate change (Barrett)

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 Why are these bills important?

Energy dollars spent on fossil fuels go out of state, taking billions out of our economy each year. Committing to clean energy creates jobs, stabilizes energy prices, reduces hospitalization and emergency room visits, and models local solutions to combat the global climate challenge.

Massachusetts itself is experiencing a major power transition, with coal and nuclear plants phasing out while resources like solar have grown exponentially and new industries like offshore wind and energy storage are poised to launch. However, we are not on track to meet our 2020 and 2050 climate goals, and the expansion of renewable energy is necessary to create a clean energy backstop for electric vehicles and sustainable public transportation.

| TOP | CLIMATE/ENERGY |

What do these bills do?

Creating 21st-Century Clean Energy Jobs (S.1880)

Comprehensive clean energy reforms will create thousands of Massachusetts jobs and uphold our state’s commitment to reduce carbon emissions. Among other things, this legislation would accelerate the Renewable Portfolio Standard* and ensure customers in municipal-owned light plant districts have access to clean energy, remove arbitrary restrictions on solar development that hurt our economy, enhance our state’s commitment to offshore wind to a 4000 megawatt target, set clear goals for deployment of energy storage, create an oil heat efficiency program to give better cost-saving opportunities to oil heat customers, improve transparency in home energy efficiency, modernize our electric grid, and establish a comprehensive climate adaptation and resiliency plan.

| TOP | CLIMATE/ENERGY |

Growing Solar Energy (H.2706/S.1864)

Massachusetts is a leader in solar energy: solar capacity has grown from 10 megawatts (MW) in 2009 to more than 1,200 MW today, fostering a solar industry that has created 15,000 jobs. As the sun is always free, relying on local solar energy helps protect against volatility in the price of fossil fuels from out of state. H.2706/S.1864 would remove barriers to solar development known as “net metering caps,” accelerate the Renewable Portfolio Standard to increase by 3% per year, and set a statewide solar target.**

| TOP | CLIMATE/ENERGY |

Preventing the Pipeline Tax and Reforming the Department of Public Utilities (H.3400/S.1847)

Fossil fuel interests have recently attempted to tax ratepayers for new fracked gas pipeline expansion––a move opposed by progressive activists, legislators across the political spectrum, and the Attorney General Maura Healey. Although the state’s Department of Public Utilities approved this practice, the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court struck down the DPU’s decision in 2016. H.3400/S.1847 would codify the SJC’s ruling, ensure the public’s ability to intervene at the DPU, protect ratepayers against self-dealing by energy conglomerates, reform pipeline siting to protect landowners and conservation areas, and hold local distribution gas contracts to high standards regarding the capacity they are allowed to buy.

| TOP | CLIMATE/ENERGY |

Carbon Pricing Policies (H.1726 & S.1821)

Many economists, advocates, corporations, and governments worldwide support pricing fossil fuels to reflect the true costs of climate change and damages to public health. Massachusetts already participates in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, which effectively prices power plant emissions. However, the transportation sector is a huge source of emissions, and we cannot meet our climate change goals without addressing it. S.1821 would institute a revenue-neutral carbon price, meaning that the entirety of the proceeds is returned to residents and businesses. H.1726 would also return the majority of proceeds to the public, but would use a portion for investments in green infrastructure, creating a revenue stream and local jobs.

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Background Information

*Renewal Portfolio Standard

The Renewable Portfolio Standard is the minimum amount of clean energy utility companies like Eversource and National Grid are required to buy. It supports the development of new renewable energy, and currently increases at 1%/year.

rps.png

Image courtesy of Mass Energy Consumers Alliance

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**Net Metering

Net metering is a billing mechanism essential for consumers to benefit from solar. It is the primary mechanisms for solar customers who are renters, affordable housing residents, or managers––and, in fact, most other solar customers––to reduce their bills. Net metering is “capped” by law to curb the development of solar energy.

netmetering.png
Image courtesy of Heliopower

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| ECONOMIC JUSTICE | HOUSING | EDUCATION | HEALTHCARE | - | IMMIGRANTS’ RIGHTS | CRIMINAL JUSTICE REFORMS | - | VOTER ACCESS | - | CLIMATE/ENERGY |

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